Another 100 books everyone must have read II

It has been well over a month since I gave you half of the list of another 100 books you must have read if you have any inclination to be a wise, well-knowing, incisive and thoughtful member of the human community …. or at least to be thought so.

The first part of the list can be found here:

https://vahshatedil.wordpress.com/2011/01/04/another-100-books-everyone-must-have-read/

and in it, you will find a link for the first 100 books too.

I must confess compiling this list did take some time and effort, thus accounting for the delay. When you have been reading over 300 or so books every year for the past decade or so (despite a highly active day), recollecting the book you would want at a given time can be difficult for even those titans possessing a most prodigious memory such as me …. (the name is not forgotten, it just cannot be retrieved and may suddenly come when you least expect it, or at a most inopportune moment – several instances come to mind, but lets not digress). However, it is finally done.

I do expect there will be lots of those who take issue with this list, questioning a particular inclusion or exclusion, or even a particular work of a particular author and espousing the cause of another one. I will welcome reasoned debate, but urge those, who feel any of these issues to be a marked affront, to compile their own lists in which they can indulge in their own st… choices.

I do guess that there are some entries which maybe unfamiliar to the casual reader (which unfortunately most of the world happens to be) , and I did promise I will give information about each of my entries. I do acknowledge that I have been remiss in this but do vow to do soon… within a fortnight I promise.

And now the list – and yes, like last time, some titles have been truncated in the list and such names have been marked with an asterisk. The full names can be found after the list.

51. Sunlight on a Broken Column                     – Attia Hossain
52. The Samaritan’s Secret                                  – Matt Beynon Rees
53. Master of the Jinn: A Sufi Novel               – Irving Karchmeyer
54. *A Walk in the Woods                                   – Bill Bryson
55. *Ex Libris                                                           – Anne Fadiman
56. *The Ayatollahs’ Democracy                     – Hooman Majd
57. Bagh-o-Bahaar                                                 – Mir Amman Dehlavi
58. The Uses of Pessimism                                  – Roger Scruton
59. I Never Knew There Was A Word For It – Adam Jacot de Boinod
60. Yaadon ki Baraat                                              –  Josh Malihabadi
61. The Magnetic North                                         – Sara Wheeler
62. The Kingdom of Shadows                              – Alan Furst
63. SS-GB                                                                     – Len Deighton
64. Bajang-e-Aamad                                               – Col. Mohd. Khan
65. The Terrorists                                                    – Maj Sjolwall & Per Wahloo
66. Disco for the Departed                                   – Colin Cotterill
67. The Order of the Death’s Head                    – Heinz Höhne
68. Flashman at the Charge                                 – George McDonald Fraser
69. The Janissary Tree                                          – Jason Goodwin
70. The Damascened Blade                                 – Barbara Cleverly
71. Twelve                                                                  – Jasper Kent
72. The Killing of Richard III                             – Robert Farrington
73. I am a Cat                                                            – Natsume Soseki
74. The Reason Why                                              – Cecil Woodham-Smith
75. History of the Crusades                                – Sir Steven Runciman
76. My Uncle Napoleon                                       – Iraj Pezeshkzad
77. Distant Drum                                                   – Manohar Malgaonkar
78. Catch-22                                                            – Joseph Heller
79. The Last Legion                                              – Valerio Massimo Manfredi
80.  *Inside the Jihad                                           – ‘Omar Nasiri’
81. The Outsider                                                     – Colin Wilson
82. The Hunt for Red October                          – Tom Clancy
83. A Case of Exploding Mangoes                   – Mohammad Hanif
84. *The Year That Changed the World        – Michael Mayer
85. The Name of the Rose                                   – Umberto Eco
86. *The East Wind                                                – Zamiruddin Ahmad
87. Sourcery                                                            – Terry Pratchett
88. The Devil Rides Out                                       – Dennis Wheatley
89. Nuskha-e-Wafa                                                – Faiz Ahmed ‘Faiz’
90. Diwan-e-Saqib                                                 – Saqib Lakhnavi
91. Encore Provence                                            – Peter Mayle
92. Judgment on Deltchev                                 – Eric Ambler
93. Why is Q Always Followed by U?            –  Michael Quinion
94. The Man Who Knew Too Much                – G.K.Chesterton
95. Masnavi Sehr ul-Bayan                                – Mir Hasan
96. The Undercover Economist                     – Tim Harford
97. *Blood, Iron and Gold                                – Christian Wolmar
98. Shah of Shahs                                                 – Ryszard Kapuściński
99. The Language Report                                 – Susie Dent
100.13 Things That Don’t Make Sense        – Michael Brooks

#44~:  Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail
#55~: Confessions of a Common Reader
#56~: An Iranian Challenge
#58~ : And the Danger of False Hope
#80~: : My Life with al Qaeda, a Spy’s story
#84~: The Untold Story Behind the Fall of the Berlin Wall
#86~: : And Other Short Stories
#97~: How the Railways Transformed the World
#100~:The Most Intriguing Scientific Mysteries of Our Time

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